St Margaret College, Secondary School, Verdala  |  (+356) 25985400|smc.verdala.ss@ilearn.edu.mt
Applied Science 2018-10-26T08:46:19+00:00

Applied Science

Our students learn science faster through application of knowledge

Application of scientific knowledge makes science more valuable at school and throughout my 25 year experience as a Science teacher I can admit that students can learn scientific knowledge faster if science is taught in an applied way. Teaching Science to Core Curriculum Programme (CCP) students is not easy and it entails more planning and thinking. One has to be very flexible and improvise various methods of teaching all the time. The application of scientific knowledge can be very effective to help our students memorize and understand more scientific concepts and theories which can sound abstract to them.

This progressive application of scientific knowledge is highlighted by Isaac Asimov in his book, ‘Chronology of science and discovery’ (originally published in 1989), which beautifully describes how science has shaped the world, from the discovery of fire until the 20th century.

In present day education it is highly important to seriously consider the application of science knowledge in education at all school levels; not just to engage more our students in curriculum and teach them about scientific knowledge, but crucially to provide them with a basic understanding of how science has shaped the world and human civilisation.

Schools need to become the most important application hub of science and our science students need to be involved in debate and decision-making about the fair and sustainable application of new technologies, which would help to address problems such as social inequality and the misuse of scientific discoveries. For example, as much as students should see a positive goal in the increase in welfare and life expectancy they should also be aware of the current problems of inequality relating to food supply and health resources.

So science education should not only address how we apply scientific knowledge to enhance our student’s memory and understanding of scientific concepts and theories but also how to improve the human wellbeing and condition of life.

Science education should be entirely at the service of human needs, and not just to pursue knowledge for its own sake. Science is not only necessary for humanity to succeed socially, environmentally and economically in both the short and the long term, but it is also the best tool available to satisfy the fundamental human thirst for knowledge, as well as to maintain and enhance the human cultural heritage, which is knowledge-based by definition.

 

Written by

Martin Azzopardi sdc

B.A. (Hons) Theol. & H.S., P.G.C.E., M.A. (melit.)

Senior Science teacher at St. Margaret College Secondary School, Verdala Cospicua.

St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala students: Sciberras Mikael and Zammit Caydon together with their Science teacher Martin Azzopardi sdc learning science through application of knowledge.

St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala students: Sciberras Mikael and Zammit Caydon together with their Science teacher Martin Azzopardi sdc learning science through application of knowledge.

St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala students: Sciberras Mikael and Zammit Caydon together with their Science teacher Martin Azzopardi sdc learning science through application of knowledge.

 

October 23rd, 2020|

Our School is mentioned once again on Xinhua Net News as they offer a brief coverage to the three oldest books found at the National Bibliotheca

The name of our school is mentioned once again on XinhuaNet News as they offer a brief coverage to the three oldest books about China found at the National Bibliotheca of Malta.

See the link here please: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-09/12/c_139363600.htm

Article 2020 -The three oldest books about China found in the National Bibliotheca of Malta by Martin Azzopardi sdc

September 15th, 2020|

National Young Reporter’s for the Environment Competition: Wonderful News!

Out of so many participating state/church/independent schools, our School Religion and Science Department students hit once again the top records of the National Young Reporter’s for the Environment Competition as follows:

 

Honourable mention in the category of YRE Article 15-18

  1. Young Reporter’s for the Environment students launch a litter less project campaign in making Paper Roll Angel decorations for Advent and Christmas

by Religion Dept. students: Miguel Fenech, Jurgen Xuereb, Jayden Degiorgio

 

Finalists and Commended YRE 2019 – 2020 Article 15 – 18

  1. Applied Science CCP students create awareness about the risks of extra sugar in our daily diets – COMMENDED

by Science Dept. students: Decelis Luca, Zammit Kaylon, Knaan Gaze, Bonnici Raiza

  1. Raising an awareness campaign about breast cancer at school during the Pink October Campaign – COMMENDED

by Science Dept. students: Emerson Bugeja, Daishan Psaila, Jean Vella, Tiernan Fraser

  1. Verdala Queen’s Young Verdala Leaders Group commemorate Mental Illness Awareness Week – COMMENDED

by Science Dept. student: Shaun Portelli

  1. Maltese students join Missio Malta in aid of the Myanmar missionary campaign – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. students: Maya Nussbaum, Sarah Fiorini, Cody Parnis, Jake Chetcuti

  1. A Pro-Life Catholic Irish couple addresses Maltese students who recite the Rosary of the Unborn – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. students: Scicluna Raisa, Bonello Owen

  1. Maltese students commemorate the 75th anniversary of Auschwitz Liberation Camp Day – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. students:  Klaydi Borg, Darnoc Mizzi, Grech Carl, Mariema Zahra

  1. Young Reporter’s for the Environment students launch a litter less project campaign in making Paper Roll Angel decorations for Advent and Christmas – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. students:  Miguel Fenech, Jurgen Xuereb, Jayden Degiorgio

 

Finalists and Commended YRE 2019 – 2020 Photo 15 – 18

  1. Do cliffs need doors? – FINALIST

by Religion Dept. student: Maya Nussbaun

  1. Halloween pumpkins scaring the cliffs – FINALIST

by Religion Dept. student: Maya Nussbaun

  1. Construction waste an eyesore to our natural environment – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. student: Jasmin Farrugia

  1. Baby playpen ends up on Xaqqa Cliffs – COMMENDED

by Religion Dept. student: Maya Nussbaun

  1. Burnt Fanta lemonade bottles poison the natural habitat

by Religion Dept. student: Maya Nussbaun

  1. Creaky water pump mills in need of repair

by Religion Dept. student: Jasmin Farrugia

  1. Humpty Dumpty downfall of a rubble wall

by Religion Dept. student: Jasmin Farrugia

N.B. We were the first school to win the International YRE award with a SOLAR PANEL CAR PROJECT from our School Science Dept. and this year all the 14 Science and Religion YRE project entries are awarded even a project by CCP Science students.

I take the opportunity to THANK especially all my Religion and Science students who collaborated in fulfilling these YRE projects in favour of our local environment.  VERY WELL DONE and PRAISE BE TO GOD.

Also congratulations to other awarded participants from our school which I leave for Ms Flavia Grima to announce. VERY WELL DONE.

I thank YRE National Coordinator Ms Audrey Gauci for her kind help and support and the two foreign correctors who sacrificed their free time correcting our Science and Religion Department YRE project entries.

I also thank Ms Josephine Diacono, Fr Karm Spiteri ocd and school clerks Ms Patricia Farrugia and Ms Lorraine Vella for their kind help and support throughout the whole year, much appreciated.

Finally I thank Ms Marlene Galea and Mr Andrew Calleja plus the editors of the Malta Independent on Sunday newspaper, Sunday Times of Malta and Missio Mata for contributing in the dissemination process.

Thanks in regards

Martin Azzopardi sdc

Veteran YRE school coordinator

St. Margaret College

Secondary School,

Verdala, Cospicua,

Malta

July 1st, 2020|

Article on the 10th anniversary anniversary of the Science/China Corner has been published on the official Cultural Magazine of the China Ministry of Culture & Tourism

The official cultural magazine of the China Ministry of Culture and Tourism called: 中外文化交流 – China and the World Cultural Exchange, had the pleasure to publish our school article on the 10th anniversary of the Science/China Corner of St. Margaret College Secondary School, Verdala, Cospicua, Malta.

See the published article on the link here:
http://cn.chinaculture.org/portal/site/wenhua/mag/cn/2020/m_4/mobile/index.html#p=62

June 16th, 2020|

The 10th anniversary of the Science/China Corner of St. Margaret College Secondary School, Verdala, Cospicua, Malta 2010 – 2020

The Science/China Corner of St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala, Cospicua was founded by Senior Science teacher Mr Martin Azzopardi sdc in 2010 following his first visit to China.

“I always loved China and its long history and culture since childhood but following my first visit to China in 2010 I returned back to Malta with so much interest and love for Chinese culture that I wanted to share this interest of mine with all my Science students” says teacher Martin Azzopardi sdc.

The Science/China corner was founded by teacher Mr Martin Azzopardi sdc in collaboration with the Malta China Cultural Centre and with the blessing of the Ministry of Education. It was founded as a Montessori Method of teaching Science with the aim of introducing Chinese culture, science and technology to Maltese students. This method surely enhances the multicultural aspect in students and leads them to develop more interest in research and reading particularly about China – a country with a long rich history of achievements especially in the Science and Technology field.

This year marks the 10th anniversary since the foundation of the Science/China Corner and throughout these years many students have benefitted from various Science and Technology research study projects in link with Chinese culture. Throughout these 10 years students did various research studies about various themes like: Making of Chinese Porcelain and Pottery, Healthy Benefits of Chinese Tea, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Invention of Chinese Fans, Making of Silk in China, Invention of Paper in China, China’s Advancements in Robotics, Technique of Glass Painting and Decoration in China, Bronze Making in China, Advancements in Sensor Production in China, Making of Chinese Vases, Making of Chinese Cloisonne, Making of Dolls in China, Technique used in Jade Sculpting in China, Making of Paper Umbrellas, Paper Cutting in China, China’s Advancements in Textile Making,  Construction of the Great Wall in China, Earthquake Resistant Building in China, and many other research theme projects. Then each year these Science/China research study projects are presented by students at the MCCC in full collaboration with the MCCC Director and staff and the China Embassy of Malta.

Throughout these 10 years, the Science/China Corner of St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala, Cospicua managed also to offer students different lectures about China and involve them in various Chinese workshops, events and activities helping them to create a bridge between the scientific knowledge field and Chinese Culture, Science & Technology.

In October 2019, the  Foreign and European Affairs Minister Mr Evarist Bartolo, then responsible for Education, said the following words about the Science/China Corner: “A good initiative that brings people, cultures and countries together, thanks a real lot for this work”.

In December 2019, H.E. the Chinese Ambassador for Malta, Mr Jiang Jiang, on being interviewed by two students from St. Margaret College commented:

Before I came to Malta I already knew about the foundation of the China Corner at St. Margaret College and every year I am impressed with the deep research studies done by St. Margaret College students linking the Science field with Chinese culture and technologies. This is a very good idea.

In February 2019, the Cultural Counsellor of the Chinese Embassy in Korea, Director of China Cultural Centre in Seoul / Representative of   China Tourism Office in Seoul, Mr Wang Yanjun, then Director of the Malta China Cultural Centre, on being interviewed by three students from St. Margaret College added:

 “Here I must express my sincere thanks to Mr Martin Azzopardi for coming up with the idea of founding the China Corner in the Science Department of St. Margaret College in 2010. This is one of the best ways to help students get in touch with Chinese culture via the Science and Technology field. It is also something permanent which can help to cultivate appreciation for Chinese culture amongst Maltese students throughout the scholastic year. Every year I am impressed by the research studies held by your students, linking Science knowledge & technology with Chinese culture. I can say that I myself have learnt lots from these research study projects, presented by your students under the supervision of their teacher Martin Azzopardi. Please keep it up”.

In January 2020, the Director of the Malta China Cultural Centre, Mr Yang Xiaolong wrote saying:

“It is a lovely initiative; both you (Mr Martin) and your students are great! Highly appreciate your efforts to promote bilateral understanding and friendship between Malta and China”.

In March 2020, H.E. the now ex-Chinese Ambassador for Malta, Mr Cai Jinbiao wrote saying:

“It brings back a lot of happy memories. Congratulations again for a job well done and wishing you greater success in the coming years. Thank you”.

In March 2020, the President of the Malta-Sino Friendship Society, Mr Reno Calleja added:

I congratulate with Mr Martin Azzopardi for this initiative which surely shows his continuous commitment towards education and Chinese culture”.

In March 2020, the  Education Minister Dr Owen Bonnici, wrote saying:“Just looking at all this prestigious work done on the Science/China corner throughout these last 10 years, I tend to say VERY WELL DONE and KEEP IT UP. Such an initiative is surely a catalyst for our Maltese students in enhancing their multicultural aspect and induce in them more love for study research. It is also an opportunity for our students to be young ambassadors between Malta and China. YOU HAVE MY FULL SUPPORT.”

Finally BIG thanks go to the MCCC and the China Embassy for all their HELP, APPRECIATION and SUPPORT throughout these 10 years since the foundation of the Science/China Corner at St. Margaret College, much appreciated. Special thanks go to MCCC Directors:  Mr Gu HongxingMr Wang Yanjun and Mr Yang Xiaolong and staff. Big thanks also to H.E. the Chinese Ambassador Mr Cai Jinbiao and to H.E. the Chinese Ambassador Mr Jiang Jiang and Embassy staff.

 

Article written by

Mr Martin Azzopardi sdc

B.A. (Hons) Theol. & Human Studies, P.G.C.E., M.A. (Melit.)

Senior Teacher

Science Department

St. Margaret College

Secondary School,

Verdala,

Cospicua,

Malta

and

Deputy President

of the M.A.S.C.

Faculty of Theology

University of Malta

and

Dissertation Supervisor

Institute for Education

Malta.

 

Addendum:

Mr Azzopardi has been serving as a teacher in St. Margaret College for these last 25 years. St. Margaret College Secondary School was the Ex-Royal Navy School of Malta and then it became a state Grammar School for boys under the name of Giuseppe Despott Boys Junior Lyceum, Verdala, Cospicua. Since the comprehensive system was adopted in Malta, the name of the school changed to that of St. Margaret College Secondary School, Verdala, Cospicua with an intake of around 450 students with mixed abilities as the grammar school system was abolished from Malta. Then when segregation was abolished too from the educational state sector, St. Margaret College adopted the mixed gender education system or co-ed system and it was split into a Middle School (11-12 year old students) and a Secondary School (13-15 year old students).

May 26th, 2020|

YRE Article 5 – Young Reporters for the Environment students launch a litter-less project campaign in making paper roll angel decorations for Advent and Christmas

Thank you to Miguel Fenech, Jurgen Xuereb, Jayden Degiorgio (Form 4 students) who cooperated to fulfill this YRE article project.

On Monday, 2nd December 2019, a group of Young Reporters for the Environment students at St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala, Cospicua exhibited the paper roll angel decorations hand made by a group of participating Science students. These paper roll angel decorations are used to decorate the school image of the Baby Jesus. Before starting the Advent season, the Science Department of St. Margaret College encouraged many Science students to participate in this litter-less project campaign in making paper roll angel decorations using ONLY recycled material. Students had to provide their own recycled material like toilet rolls, wool, parcel wrap paper, cotton, embroidery threads and ribbons, plus colours or paint. Then for those who opted to make their angel decorations at school, all the necessary tools were provided but the majority of the students preferred to work on their paper roll angel decorations at home.

Science Teacher Martin Azzopardi sdc, who coordinated this Litter-less Campaign school project said: “Our science students were very eager to participate in this project as it was an opportunity for them to be creative and environment-friendly at the same time. It was also a challenge for them as they were limited to make use ONLY of recycled material and for some students who worked in pairs or in groups it was also an opportunity to experience a team spirit in favour of our environment”.

To make these paper roll angel decorations, students had to follow some steps:

  1. After gathering all their recycled material, they covered the toilet paper roll with pieces of fabric or paper to make the angel dress.
  2. Then to make the angel’s hands pieces of metal strips or wooden tooth- picks were used. Others made use of hard paper strips to make the hands which were then covered with fabric or paper to create the long sleeves.
  3. To make the angel’s head, some students used tennis balls but some others preferred to create the head using soft paper or spray bottle cups. Then colours and buttons were used to make the angel’s face.
  4. In making the angel’s hair, many students made use of recycled cotton or fabric while others used strips of soft paper which were then glued to the head.

Then to create the angel’s wings, students drew the wings on hard paper first and then decorated them using colours, glittered paper or cotton. Many used glue to stick the wings to the body but some others used pins or needles.

To be more environment friendly, some students made their own glue using natural ingredients like water and flour.

This Christmas all the participating students in this litter-less school project campaign can surely feel the satisfaction of making their own paper roll angel decorations adopting the three R’s – REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE – which all help to cut down on the amount of waste we throw away. In doing so students learn to conserve natural resources and energy plus save money communities must use to dispose of waste in landfills.

This project aims to reach three of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: Responsible Consumption and Production, Climate Action, and Quality Education.

May 25th, 2020|

YRE Article 3 – Verdala Queen’s Young Leaders Group commemorate Mental Illness Awareness Week

Thank you to Shaun Portelli (Form 5 student) who cooperated to fulfill this YRE article project.

Mental Illness Awareness Week is commemorated from the 6th till the 12th of October and this year, World Mental Health Day and National Depression Screening Day is commemorated on the 10th of October.

On Wednesday October 9, 2019, St. Margaret College Verdala School Queen’s Young Leaders Group assembled with their group founder and teacher, Martin Azzopardi sdc, to raise awareness about mental health among students at school.

St Margaret Queen’s Young Leaders Group was founded in 2014 and each year student members are inspired by the speeches of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II to write and publish articles promoting moral and social values. On World Mental Health Day, St Margaret College students focussed their attention on statistics about mental health in Malta as quoted by The Times of Malta newspaper (dated 10th Oct. 2019)

The Times of Malta says that the Maltese Association of Psychiatry and the Association of Public Health Medicine In Malta report that there are about 20 suicides in men and two in women yearly in Malta. These associations have called for more awareness on mental health and for action plans to reduce suicides by 10 per cent by 2020, in line with World Health Organisation recommendations.

In fact this year the World Mental Health Day is focusing on suicide prevention saying that every suicide can be prevented and this issue needs to be tackled urgently.

Surely there are a number of measures that can be taken to reduce suicides, including early identification, treatment and care of people with mental and substance use disorders, chronic pain and acute emotional distress; reducing access to the means of suicide; and training further non-specialized health workers.

The Maltese Association of Psychiatry and the Malta Association of Public Health Medicine In Malta insist saying that raising community awareness and breaking down the taboo to access help for ourselves or for others, is vitally important in preventing suicide.

St Margaret Queen’s Young Leaders Group found out that unfortunately many people do not seek help in the early stages of mental illnesses because they don’t recognize the symptoms. (See: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mental-illness/symptoms-causes/syc-20374968)

Quoting the www.helpguide.org the 7 major mental health conditions are Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Psychosis, Eating Disorders, Depression, PTSD, and Addiction/Substance Use Disorder.

Taking a mental health screening is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition. Screening helps catch problems early. A screening is not a diagnosis, but it can be a helpful tool for starting a conversation with your doctor or psychiatrist about your mental health.

Education and schools must contribute to create a mentally healthy environment for children and young people. St Margaret Queen’s Young Leaders Group is calling on all those involved in education to address seriously the issue of mental health in schools and deliver an effective change.

This project aims to reach two of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: Good Health and Well-being, and Quality Education.

May 25th, 2020|

YRE Article 2 – Raising an awareness campaign about breast cancer at school during the Pink October Campaign

Thank you to Emerson Bugeja, Daishan Psaila, Jean Vella, Tiernan Fraser (Form 4 students) who cooperated to fulfill this YRE article project.

On Monday, 30th September 2019 a school morning assembly was dedicated to the Breast Cancer October Month Campaign at St. Margaret College Secondary School Verdala, Cospicua. Then on Wednesday, 2nd October 2019 St. Margaret College Verdala School Queen’s Young Leaders Group assembled with their group founder teacher, Martin Azzopardi sdc, to launch an awareness campaign research study about breast cancer as part of the Pink Colour Ribbon Campaign. Inspired by the speeches of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, St. Margaret College Queen’s Young Leaders Group highlights the importance of awareness about breast cancer while stressing prevention.

According to the www.news.cn (dated 2019-07-05), in Malta87 percent of Maltese women treated for breast cancer are diagnosed clear from the disease for a period of five years. This places Malta at a highest percentage among European Union member states. Malta’s Deputy Prime Minister and Health Minister Chris Fearne said that in Malta a total of 80,000 mammograms have been performed since the National Breast Screening Services were first launched in 2009. Minister Fearne said also that the expense on new medicine aimed at curing cancer has gone up to 4.5 million euro. He pledged that the Maltese government will continue to invest in technology to treat cancer.

Quoting recent studies issued in 2018 by the Breast Cancer Now (https://breastcancernow.org), breast cancer can develop in the breast cells of both men and women, but it is more common to be found in women. In the UK around 11,500 women and 80 men die every year from breast cancer. This leads breast cancer to be the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the UK.

Research found that less than half (48%) of British women surveyed were regularly checking their breasts for signs of breast cancer, while almost one in ten (8%) had never checked at all. The most common reasons women cited for not checking their breasts regularly were because they forget (41%) and 21% said they didn’t check their breasts regularly because they don’t feel confident in checking.

Checking your breasts will only take you a few minutes. When touching your breasts and looking for changes, one has to check the whole breast area, including the upper chest and armpits. Common breast cancer signs and symptoms include:

  1. A lump or swelling in the breast, upper chest or armpit. One might feel the lump, but not see it.
  2. Changes in the size or shape of the breast
  3. A change in skin texture i.e. puckering or dimpling of the skin
  4. A change in the colour of the breast – the breast may look red or inflamed
  5. Rash, crusting or changes to the nipple

There are various factors that can affect one’s chances of developing breast cancer. It can result from the way we live our lives, our genes and our surrounding environment.

So the question is: What can we do to reduce the risk of breast cancer?

We can prevent the chance of getting breast cancer by making small healthy changes and living well, by drinking less alcohol, maintaining a healthy weight and keeping physically active.

This project aims to reach two of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: Good Health and Well-being, and Quality Education.

May 25th, 2020|

YRE Article 1 – Applied Science CCP students create awareness about the risks of extra sugar in our daily diets

Thank you to Decelis Luca, Zammit Kaylon, Knaan Gaze, Bonnici Raiza (Form 4 CCP students) who cooperated to fulfill this YRE article project.


On Tuesday, 29th October 2019, a group of Applied Science CCP students launched a project to create awareness about the risks of extra sugar in our daily diets. Coordinated by their Science teacher, Martin Azzopardi sdc, students found that extra sugar in our daily diets has many negative health effects.

Nowadays many people rely on processed foods for meals and snacks but these products very often contain much added sugar. Every 4 grams of sugar amount to one teaspoon of sugar and so one must start noticing the amount of sugar in every packet or tin of food that is purchased from the food supermarkets. The main risk of extra sugar in our diet is obesity.

Quoting the https://www.pwc.com Malta has one of the highest rates of adult and childhood obesity worldwide. In fact over a quarter of the Maltese adult population over 15 years is obese. The prevalence of obesity increased from 23% in 2002 to 25% in 2015 – moving farther away from Malta’s 2020 target rate set at 18%. This study also reveals that adult obesity cost Malta €36 million which is a big economic challenge to our society, not only in terms of the additional healthcare spending but also in terms of the opportunity costs to government, individuals and society.

According to healthline.com, scientists say that extra sugar consumption in our daily diets is the major cause of obesity and many chronic diseases. Extra sugar can cause:

  1. Obesity: too much added sugar in our daily diets increases the risk of weight gain and fats in our bodies.
  2. Heart Disease: too much added sugar increases the risk for heart disease factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and inflammation.
  3. Acne Problem: High-sugar diets can increase our bodies’ androgen secretion, oil production and inflammation which can increase the chance of developing acne.
  4. Type 2 Diabetes: A high-sugar diet may lead to obesity and insulin resistance (a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates blood sugar levels), both of which are risk factors for type 2 diabetes.
  5. Cancer: Too much sugar can lead to obesity, insulin resistance and inflammation, all of which are risk factors for cancer, mostly oesophageal cancer, pleural cancer and cancer of the small intestine.
  6. Depression: Too much added sugar and processed foods may increase depression risk in both men and women. Scientific research has shown that people who consumed 67 grams or more of sugar per day were 23% more likely to develop depression than other people who ate less than40 grams per day.
  7. Accelerate Skin Ageing: Sugary foods can increase the production of AGEs (Advanced glycation end products), which can accelerate skin aging and wrinkle formation. In fact AGEs damage collagen and elastin, which are proteins that help the skin stretch and keep its beauty.
  8. Fatty Liver: The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. Glucose is taken up by many cells throughout the body but fructose overloads the liver, leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by excessive fat build-up in the liver.
  9. Dementia: High-sugar diets can worsen thecognitive decline and increase the risk of dementia.
  10. Kidney Disease: Consistently high blood sugar levels can cause damage to the delicate blood vessels of the kidneys and lead to an increased risk of kidney disease.

So keep a food diary and be more aware of the main sources of sugar in your daily diet. Try to prepare your own healthy meals at home and avoid buying foods and drinks that are high in added sugar. Avoid alcoholic beverages that are sweetened with soda, juice, honey and sugar and eat more whole, unprocessed foods.

This project aims to reach two of the main goals proposed by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals:  Good Health and Well-being, Life on Land, Quality Education.

 

May 25th, 2020|

St. Margaret College Senior Secondary School Verdala seek the meaning of the Chinese New Year of the Rat – January 2020

According to the Chinese Zodiac calendar, the date of the Chinese New Year 2020 is the 25th of January. 2020 is the year of the Rat or Mouse and the rat is the first of all zodiac animals. According to a legend, the order of the animals in the Chinese zodiac calendar depends on the arrival of a group of animals to the party of Jade Emperor. The Ox was heading first but the rat tricked the ox by asking him a ride and when they arrived at the finish line the rat jumped down from the Ox and arrived first.
In Chinese culture, rats are a symbol of wealth and during the year of the rat, many people pray to have a better wealthy life while married couples pray to have children. People born in the year of the rat (recent years of the rat are: 1924, 1936, 1948, 1960, 1972, 1984, 1996, 2008, 2020) are thought to be clever, quick thinkers, successful and satisfied with living a peaceful and quiet life. They are also sensitive to the emotions of others and stubborn with their own opinion.
Men born in the year of the Rat are thought to be clever and adapt quickly to new environments plus creative and taking advantage of opportunities that happen in life. Though men born in this year are assumed to have many ideas then they are not
suitable for leadership positions. On the other hand, women born in the year of the Rat are thought to be good
organizers and family-oriented. They are also very responsible and able at the same time.

However, whether one is born in the year of the rat or not he/she might experience both successes and failures in life. One might also experience sufferings when it comes to relationships and health as this is part of life. So whether one is experiencing happiness or sadness, good or bad feelings throughout the year of the Rat, it is worth taking life DAY BY DAY as Jesus says it is “Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof” (Matthew 6:34). This implies that one should not worry about the future since life contains an ample burden of evils and suffering. So DO YOUR BEST THEN GOD WILL DO THE REST. We wish a Happy Chinese New Year of the Rat to everyone especially to all the
Chinese people living in Malta.

Written by Miguel Fenech, Jurgen Xuereb and Jayden Degiorgio
Students at St. Margaret College Senior Secondary School, Verdala, Cospicua,
Malta.

January 22nd, 2020|

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